This is postmarked September 15, 1917  and addressed to a woman in Bernville, PA
The back transcribed:
"Well Laura where are you sticking all Summer
Are you still on the farm or are you married and live some place in the city
Hoping to hear from you soon
Laura Reinert Kutztown”
This correspondence is an excellent reflection of life back in the 1910s-1920s. The writer was wondering what her friend will be up to come summertime. Either still living out in the country helping her family on the farm…or nestled in the city married to a man perhaps of industry or business. The majority of women during this time period, especially in Pennsylvania, had not caught the wave of women’s suffrage that was quickly swarming urban areas such as New York or Chicago. Many women of Kutztown were certainly still accustomed to the expected traditional roles of the domesticated woman: cooking, cleaning, and taking care of her husband and children. A bit of history: Women gained the right to vote in America on August 18, 1920 with the ratification of the 19th amendment.

This is postmarked September 15, 1917  and addressed to a woman in Bernville, PA

The back transcribed:

"Well Laura where are you sticking all Summer

Are you still on the farm or are you married and live some place in the city

Hoping to hear from you soon

Laura Reinert Kutztown”

This correspondence is an excellent reflection of life back in the 1910s-1920s. The writer was wondering what her friend will be up to come summertime. Either still living out in the country helping her family on the farm…or nestled in the city married to a man perhaps of industry or business. The majority of women during this time period, especially in Pennsylvania, had not caught the wave of women’s suffrage that was quickly swarming urban areas such as New York or Chicago. Many women of Kutztown were certainly still accustomed to the expected traditional roles of the domesticated woman: cooking, cleaning, and taking care of her husband and children. A bit of history: Women gained the right to vote in America on August 18, 1920 with the ratification of the 19th amendment.

These are a few of my favorite photographs from the latest volume I’ve been scanning. The dates and photographers are unknown but these must be from the early 20th century, maybe even 1920s. A few of the girls reappear in different scenes which leads me to believe they must all come from a wealthy family and are related to each other in some way or another.

Hello all. I want to apologize for the lack of posting on this blog. I have spent some time at the historical society and have a fresh volume of photographs to begin sharing with you. The bulk of this volume focuses individuals, families, and groups of Kutztown. The majority of these postcards are unmarked—no date, photographer, publisher, or any information relating to what’s going on in the photo. Through my own interpretation and research in the library I hope to find more out about the mysterious faces in these photographs to offer a glimpse of life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
This photo in particular strikes me with inquiry; who is this little girl and what is her story?

Hello all. I want to apologize for the lack of posting on this blog. I have spent some time at the historical society and have a fresh volume of photographs to begin sharing with you. The bulk of this volume focuses individuals, families, and groups of Kutztown. The majority of these postcards are unmarked—no date, photographer, publisher, or any information relating to what’s going on in the photo. Through my own interpretation and research in the library I hope to find more out about the mysterious faces in these photographs to offer a glimpse of life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

This photo in particular strikes me with inquiry; who is this little girl and what is her story?

In the spirit of Valentine’s Day…historical postcards with poetic messages. This set in particular was printed in Germany in 1907. The original photographs were printed by John Duer Scott and Edward van Altena who based a slide manufacturing company at 59 Pearl Street, New York City in the early 1900s.

Kutztown National Bank, 211 West Main Street, 1906-1911
The Kutztown National Bank was officially chartered in 1871 by Col. T.D. Fister and John Fogel. The original location was at 268 West Main Street. The bank eventually merged with the Kutztown National of Reading, becoming the official branch of Kutztown. It remained active in this location for twelve years. In 1897 Oliver P. Grimley of Boyertown organized construction of new infrastructure in which remains today.
The photographs above present the newest location of the bank erected in 1908 at 211 West Main Street. Today the bank is the location of Paradise Lost Tattoos and Body Piercings.